How to use the Turabian citation style
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The Turabian citation style is the same as the Chicago Manual of Style, seventh edition, with slight modifications for the needs of student writers. According to Kate L. Turabia 8th Edition, Turabian Citation Style presents two basic documentation systems: notes- bibliography style (or simply bibliography) and author-date style (sometimes called reference list style).

There is wide application of Bibliography style in literature, history, and the arts. This style presents bibliographic information in footnotes or endnotes and, usually, a bibliography.

The author-date style is widely used in the physical, natural and social sciences. In the Turabian author-date style, sources are briefly cited in parentheses in the text by author’s last name and date of publication. This is followed by the inclusion of parenthetical citations in a list of references, where full bibliographic information is provided.

The following is an essay in the Turabian Bibliography style written by one of our expert writers at Heroes Papers. Go through it and note how the writer uses the Turabian citation style to format the essay. Also, check our blog and samples page for more essay samples on the Turabian Style.

 

My opinion on the Caroline Doctrine

The Caroline Doctrine dates back to the antebellum period when the United States, Canada and the Great Britain had a hostile relationship. The United States wanted to expand its territories beyond the lands occupied by Canada. In the quest to take control, the U.S released the Caroline, the surveillance ship set to fight the Canadian rebels. However, the British forces attacked the ship, killed one American crew member and set the ship on fire before pushing it down the Niagara Falls.[1] In retaliation, the Americans attacked the British Ship which further compromised the two nation’s diplomatic relations. In this case, the British justified the attack naming it the Caroline Doctrine which stated the “necessity of self-defense, instant, overwhelming, leaving no choice of means, and no moment for, and deliberation.”[2]  History, especially the Caroline Doctrine, played a part in the present.

The American leaders refer to the Caroline Doctrine to solve current problems. For instance, President Harry Truman cited self-defense on his decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1954[3]. The U.S obtained consent from the United Kingdom on the grounds on self-defense. In this case, President Truman reached into the past to solve the problem of potential threat from Japan. The current negotiations with North Korea over the development of nuclear weapons stems from the Caroline Doctrine.[4] The critics of the nuclear weapons argue that the U.S should drop atomic bomb on North Korea before it is too late to defend. Citing the Caroline Doctrine, the U.S diplomats state that it is important for the government to put the interest of the citizens ahead of everything.

The past, which is the incidence of the Caroline, influenced the American foreign policy. The U.S, through its foreign policy, seeks to expand democracy beyond its borders and all over the world. According to the U.S government sources, creating a democratic world will benefit, not only the world, but also the Americans.[5] To foster democracy in the world, therefore, the U.S set on a mission to prevent the advancement of nuclear technology in the world. The decision of the U.S to prevent the development of nuclear weapons has put the country at loggerheads with some countries, for example, North Korea and Iran.

The U.S government used preemptive attacks to invade Iraq twice because of the Caroline Doctrine. In an effort to make the world democratic, the U.S invaded Iraq to neutralize the development of nuclear bomb. The U.S justifies the move by referring to the potential risk to the U.S citizens and the world if the matter is unattended to.[6]  Reports show that North Korea is currently working on weapons of mass destruction, such as Nuclear and chemical weapons.

In conclusion, it is evident that history played a part in the present. The attack on the Caroline Ship and later establishment of the Caroline Doctrine enabled the U.S to shape its foreign policy. Using the Caroline Doctrine, the U.S seeks to protect its citizens through self-defense. In this case, the U.S launched preemptive strikes on Iraq in reference to the Caroline Doctrine. Further, the current U.S and North Korea negotiations over the nuclear weapons stems from the imminent danger if North Korea goes ahead with the nuclear deal.

 

Bibliography

Jennings, R. Y.  “International Journal of International Law.” Vol. 32. No 1(Jan. 1938).

Letter from Minister Fox to Secretary of State Forsythe dated 28 January 1838.  Record Group 50 NARA.

Mulrine, Anna. “Time for a Preemptive Strike against North Korea? Some Say Yes.” The Christian Science Monitor. April 15, 2013 http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Military/2013/0415/Time-for-a-preemptive-strike-against-North-Korea-Some-say-yes?nav=topic-tag_topic_page-mostViewed.

Notes Form The British Legation In The United States To The Department Of State, 1791 – 1905,

 

[1] Daniel Webster, The Caroline, and Mr. Alexander McLeod:

[2] Ibid. 23

[3]

[4] Letter from Minister Fox to Secretary of State Forsythe dated 28 January 1838.  Record Group 50 NARA.

[5] Jennings, R. Y.  “International Journal of International Law.” Vol. 32. No 1(Jan. 1938).

[6] Mulrine, Anna. “Time for a Preemptive Strike against North Korea? Some Say Yes.” The Christian Science Monitor. April 15, 2013